Written by Big Animals Staff

“Of all mankind’s impacts on nature, perhaps none is more pervasive than the systematic elimination of large animals.”

That’s what Brandon Keim wrote recently in Wired.  His point is simple.  Extinction of animals is inevitable; in fact, many of those who lived 20,000 years ago are gone now, and others are nearly gone:  like the rinoceros and South China tiger.

But recent research has shown that when and if the world’s big animals are gone, the world will be profoundly affected.  The facts are the same whether you study a coral reef where fishing has eliminated large fish, or study lakes where researchers have experimented with removing all the largemouth bass from a certain area.  When the big animals were gone from those places and others, the ecosystems became instable. It seems that large animals keep things balanced in nature, and if we lose them it the world will be different place. Nature will “go on,” scientists agree.  But it will be vastly different from what we know. If we lose the big animals, the Earth we live on now will not be a place we would recognize.

Amos gave a presentation about ocean conservation as part of the well-known TEDx talks.  His passion for the Ocean Giants is clear, and the value of talks like this are in education – the more people come to appreciate a planet that includes big animals, the more likely we will have an Earth that our children will be able to inhabit.

Follow Big Animals on Twitter.  Join the Big Animals mailing list. Find Amos Nachoum on Facebook. Find Big Animals on Facebook.