Written by Amos Nachoum

I have been leading expeditions to the Canadian Arctic for years.  It’s an incredible trip that I would like to share with you and – according to some scientists – time is of the essence for you to come along.

Polar Bears in Danger

A recent polar bear study says that polar bear mothers and cubs are now being forced to swim hundreds of miles to reach food sources.

Why? Because the ice they use to walk across is melting.

We time our trips perfectly so that we can see the moment when polar bear mothers lead their cubs out of hibernation and into the bright sunshine for the first time. You get close to the action.  It’s an amazing time for photographs or simply enjoying Biganimals in nature.

Scientists are saying that the ice melt is causing problems for the cubs. They have to swim farther for food and long swims like that are tough for little bodies. They don’t yet have the strength or the body fat to sustain long periods of exercise in the frigid waters of the Arctic.

Polar bears are not naturally aquatic creatures – they hunt, eat, sleep, and give birth on land. Their food sources, however, are aquatic – mostly seals. A mother bear will eat the vegetation surrounding the den while her cubs grow big enough to swim in the early spring, but that’s not enough calories for a polar bear, much less a nursing polar bear. So they must swim to find food and with water levels dropping steadily, that means a long journey for the mother and her baby.

Want to know more?  On my ice trekking and wildlife photography expeditions, we travel by snowmobile and dog sled across the magnificent Canadian Arctic. Our guides are Inuits and our goal is to photograph polar bear families as they emerge from their snow dens.

This trip is filled with endless white landscapes topped by the purest of blue skies. We enjoy and photograph the breathtaking Aurora Borealis as you’ve never seen it before – so close, you’ll feel you can reach out and touch it. And of course, we get unforgettable portraits of polar bear adults and cubs. Visit the expedition page on my website to reserve your spot. I look forward to seeing you there!

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